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Re: Traumatic Brain Injury - treatments that helped me. PART 1
 
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Published: 6 years ago
 
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Re: Traumatic Brain Injury - treatments that helped me. PART 1


Yes, please post all information here. Yes, I am very open to trying new things, so please post any information you have. Thank you! I look forward to reading new info. and hopefully the things you might suggest are things that I will find affordable and accessible.

No, I am not 100% cured; the fatigue is the biggest problem to conquer. Still working on that. I have other health issues, too, and if I could just fix those ..... I might be 100%. Hopefully.

No, I did not have surgery for my brain injury. I was initially told that I have no injury! Apparently I have no structural damage to the brain, which is fortunate, but what that means is that the damage is microscopic.

One of the things I have learned is that when there is an impact to the head, the soft brain slams (usually forwards, then backwards etc.) against the hard casing of the skull. This can stretch, break, bend, stress, bruise or sever the tiny fibres (axons, neurons and all the other tiny fibres) in the brain. Even a tiny bruise in the brain can kill. Or have no effect whatsoever.

In 'mild' brain injuries, there is no consistent relation between the damage caused and the subsequent effects on the person. With brain injuries generally, doctors are loath to predict the outcome on the person's life. It is all quite unpredictable.


I fall in the category of those who are told they have a 'mild' brain injury, even though the injury's effects are drastic and life-changing. 'Mild' basically means that I can walk unaided and I can feed myself. It does not indicate quality of life!


Please provide a link to your website. Yes, I would be very happy to get the information out there on other people's websites, but I would like to look at the website first -- and I would quite probably write a bit more about myself if posting the info elsewhere (depending on the website).

One thing that I would probably mention is that I have created and run support groups for people who have brain injuries. Had I not self-treated my injury, I would barely be able to write a shopping list, let alone design and implement support projects for other people with health issues.

I try to motivate others, but unfortunately one of the symptoms of many people's brain injuries is lack of motivation/crushing apathy. So many people just dragging themselves through each day, never realising their potential.

Also, I saw a documentary about U.S. veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. (I live in Australia). Many service personnel's lives are being saved, but they are returning home with permanent brain injuries, which is a tragedy.

I watched the programme as veterans (a huge hall filled with several hundred of them sitting at tables), were handed five $1 notes and and were coached to count out the dollars, one by one, on the tables in front of them. I was almost shouting at the TV, "I used to be like that! I couldn't count two cents! Get them to lie down on a wine cask bladder! There is no need for them to be like that!"

I was 36 when I had my accident. Seeing young people aged in their early 20s, with brain injuries, makes me so sad.

If I were well enough, and could afford it, I would open a clinic that brings together all the therapies that actually work.

I will post more info, more things that worked for me, when I get the chance.
 

 
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