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Possible Test For Yeast Removal by Liver?
 
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Published: 15 years ago
 

Possible Test For Yeast Removal by Liver?


A Candida PCR blood serum test can quantify candida in the blood. And a Serum Bile Acid Assay test (not commonly done) may also be the best current method for determining liver function. But unless I'm incorrect, this additional test below MAY be helpful in determining how effective the liver is in removing bloodstream yeasts.

A comment from the Merck Medical Manual under the section "Serum Proteins/Serum immunoglobulins" (first link): "The inability to clear portal venous blood of transient bacteremias from normal colonic flora results in chronic antigenic stimulation of extrahepatic lymphoid tissue and hypergammaglobulinemia."
Translated into English: The inability of the liver to filter digestive tract bacteria from the veins coming from the digestive tract results in the production of immune antibodies by the lymph nodes or thymus, and also results in an excess of Gamma Globulins (immune antibodies) in the bloodstream.

So, if one's liver cannot adequately deal with bloodstream bacterial loads originating from the gut, we'll likely see a high Gamma Globulin count in a blood test, specifically a Serum Globulin Electrophoresis "SPEP" test, which costs about $80. Now a possible -- and logical (???) -- extension of this would be to assume that the same results might occur if instead of bacteria, YEASTS aren't being properly removed from the gut veins by the liver. If so, might this be a helpful tool in diagnosing one's bloodstream yeast removal by the liver? Considering all the apparent "Leaky Gut" symptoms (toxins in the blood) many of us suffer, I thought this test interesting.

For those who have already had standard blood panels done, they may already have a "Globulin" measurement. This may or may not be of relevance in that Gamma Globulins "GG" are but one portion of overall Globulin -- it's the GG (the antibodies) we're specifically interested in measuring. But in addition to GG antibodies, the "Globulin test" also counts enzymes and more than 500 various proteins (link #3), so large increases in GG may or may not be enough to produce a significant increase in the overall Globulin level. Perhaps someone can answer this. Links #2 & #4 confirm that Gamma Globulin normally comprises 0.7 to 1.6 g/dl (about 42%) of the total 2.0 to 3.5 g/dl serum Globulin.

Comments from knowledgable and inquisitive types are most definitely welcome!
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A Candida PCR blood serum test can quantify candida in the blood. And a Serum Bile Acid Assay test (not commonly done) may also be the best current method for determining liver function. But unless I'm incorrect, this additional test below MAY be helpful in determining how effective the liver is in removing bloodstream yeasts.

A comment from the Merck Medical Manual under the section "Serum Proteins/Serum immunoglobulins" (first link): "The inability to clear portal venous blood of transient bacteremias from normal colonic flora results in chronic antigenic stimulation of extrahepatic lymphoid tissue and hypergammaglobulinemia."
Translated into English: The inability of the liver to clear digestive tract bacteria from the veins coming from the digestive tract results in the production of immune antibodies by the lymph nodes or thymus, and also results in an excess of Gamma Globulins (immune antibodies) in the bloodstream.

So, if one's liver cannot adequately deal with bloodstream bacterial loads originating from the gut, we'll likely see a high Gamma Globulin count in a blood test, specifically a Serum Globulin Electrophoresis "SPEP" test, which costs about $80. Now a possible -- and logical (???) -- extension of this would be to assume that the same results might occur if instead of bacteria, YEASTS aren't being properly removed from the gut veins by the liver. If so, might this be a helpful tool in diagnosing one's bloodstream yeast removal by the liver? Considering all the apparent "Leaky Gut" symptoms (toxins in the blood) many of us suffer, I thought this test interesting.

For those who have already had standard blood panels done, they may already have a "Globulin" measurement. This may or may not be of relevance in that Gamma Globulins "GG" are but one portion of overall Globulin -- it's the GG (the antibodies) we're specifically interested in measuring. But in addition to GG antibodies, the "Globulin test" also counts enzymes and more than 500 various proteins (link #3), so large increases in GG may or may not be enough to produce a significant increase in the overall Globulin level. Perhaps someone can answer this. Crunching the numbers in link #3 confirms that GGs normally comprise about 60% of overall Globulin levels.

Comments from knowledgable and inquisitive types are most definitely welcome!


http://www.merck.com/mrkshared/mmanual/section4/chapter37/37a.jsp
http://www.healthcentral.com/mhc/top/003544.cfm
http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/tp/sample.html
http://www.healthcentral.com/mhc/top/003540.cfm

 

 
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