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Re: Chemical reaction of ClO2 in the body
 
Stephan2 Views: 5,467
Published: 12 years ago
 
This is a reply to # 1,526,102

Re: Chemical reaction of ClO2 in the body


Dear Tom,

As you know, the activated Miracle-Mineral-Supplement solution will easily bleach colored fabric - I have had many little spills and can attest to this. I made some activated Miracle-Mineral-Supplement and then tested with pH paper and it showed acidity, however this could be due to a remaining amount of citric acid , or due to the formation of chlorous acid as you proposed. I used backing soda to neutralize the activated Miracle-Mineral-Supplement solution until the pH paper showed ~pH 7. Then I applied a drop of this to some colored fabric and the bleaching was very much reduced, only a faintly brighter spot on the fabric.

I concluded from this that most of the ClO2 in the solution must have been converted back to NaClO2 - but I am not sure about this, at least the ClO2 was mostly gone.

Will ClO2, when bubbled through water, not bleach fabric? Isn't the oxidizing nature of ClO2 that should cause bleaching of the fabric? I haven't tried whether the un-activated MMS solution may also cause bleaching. Or is it that when mixing MMS with citric acid most of it is converted into chlorous acid, and very little ClO2 is formed? Or most of the ClO2 escapes inot the air (everybody can tell that it smells very strong right after mixing)?

I found a website that confirms your statement:

http://www.lenntech.com/processes/disinfection/chemical/disinfectants-chlorin...


So at low pH chlorous acid is formed when you mix MMS with citric acid . Especially, when you use the amounts usually proposed on the Internet. On this forum I posted an analysis that showed that one should only use one drop of 50% citric acid for two drops of MMS. If you mix it 1:1 it is very acidic due to the large amounts of citric acid that is left over from the reaction. But even in the case where you mix it right, the initial low pH probably produces ClO2- ions that form HClO2, which is chlorous acid. Chlorous acid, according to Wikipedia, is highly unstable and will decay into hypochlorous (HClO) and chloric (HClO3) acid. Now I understand that if you would use ClO2 gas and bubble it through water it will stay in the gaseous form as long as the pH is not too low (the literature says it is usable between pH 5 Ė 10).

In the above link it states that it effectively destroys bio films of bacteria and it does that by capturing a free electron thereby converting to a negative chlorite ion. This chlorite ion supposedly will convert back to chlorine dioxide when the pH is lowered, destroying bacteria that formed the acid environment. So a single chlorine dioxide molecule may perform multiple attacks against acidic bio films, interesting! But that could also mean that the salt, NaClO2 may be used effectively for oral hygiene, because it dissociates in water to Na+ ClO2- and when the chlorite ion encounters an acidic bio film, it becomes activated, destroying the bacteria.

I also worked with my dentist on the ClO2, I educated him about the benefits of MMS with regard to dental and gum health and gave him a copy of Jim Humble's book and a bottle of MMS. He found a toothpaste from CLOOSYS, that supposedly contains ClO2 but it does not make bleaching stains, I used it for a while. My dentist says that he sees very good results in his patients with the CLOOSYS toothpaste and mouthwash (which I didn't try, maybe the mouthwash has ClO2 in it).

There are other companies (such as DioxiCare) that make oral hygiene products containing ClO2. I also found patents on buffered ClO2 for oral hygiene on the Internet. It looks like industry becomes aware of the benefit of ClO2 for oral hygiene!

So the only remaining question for me is how to produce a pH neutral solution of ClO2 when you use MMS and citric acid (in the proper stoichiometric amounts). Maybe one should first dilute both MMS and the citric acid before mixing them? It should reduce the amount of ClO2 that escapes into the air. Will that lower the chance of producing chlorous acid? Maybe after that one could add some backing soda and everything is fine?

Thanks for your thoughtful inputs,

Stephan
 

 
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