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--Protein--Ammonia in the Blood--
 
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Published: 12 years ago
 
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--Protein--Ammonia in the Blood--


Hi west4,

What if your pH of 7 is from too high amount of Ammonia, for Ammonia has a High pH: From WebMD.com--Most ammonia in the body forms when protein is broken down by bacteria in the intestines. The liver normally converts ammonia into urea, which is then eliminated in urine.

Ammonia levels in the blood rise when the liver is not able to convert ammonia to urea. This may be caused by cirrhosis or severe hepatitis.

As one may see, the Blood may get an increase of Ammonia in their Blood, which may lead to more problems of Sickness and Disease ?

When this happens the Ammonia may Displace the Oxygen, thus Causing the problems of as you made Claim: feel tired to very tired to dizzy to fainting depending on how little blood you are getting to your brain, end of your idea.

For it may not be the problem of Blood getting to the brain, but a problem of what Blood does get to the brain may have too much Ammonia, which thus may Cause a Lack of needed Oxygen to the brain !

As usual not everything may be as it may first seem to be !

When the Body Lacks in the needed Alkaline Minerals and has a problem of too much Funny Protein, or protein which may have become Nitrogen in the form of Ammonia, which may "STOP" the Blood from being able to carry Oxygen, then one may have the problems you are suggesting ?

Your idea: feel tired to very tired to dizzy to fainting depending on how little blood you are getting to your brain

Maybe it may be a good idea to consider how much "MORE" Oxygen the Blood is able to carry when is does "NOT" have Ammonia in it ?

Cause and Effect !

Thus the kind of isotope the Protein(Nitrogen) has become in the Blood may determine what Effects is may play upon the body overall like, "IF" one becomes tired and Dizzy etc, vs not having these problems if one does not Cause the Nitrogen Isotope to convert to the Ammonia in the Blood ?

Could WebMD.com be on to something: Most ammonia in the body forms when protein is broken down by bacteria in the intestines. The liver normally converts ammonia into urea, which is then eliminated in urine.

Ammonia levels in the blood rise when the liver is not able to convert ammonia to urea. This may be caused by cirrhosis or severe hepatitis.


Smile Tis your choice.

 

 
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