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The Intern Blues : The Timeless Classic About the Making of a Doctor
by Robert Marion [edit]

The Intern Blues : The Timeless Classic About the Making of a Doctor
******* 7 Stars!
Price: US$ 11.17, Available worldwide on Amazon.com
Check Availability from: Canada or from United Kingdom
ISBN: 0060937092

Description

From Publishers Weekly
A New York pediatric geneticist, Marion ( Born Too Soon ) bases this thought-provoking, informative account of internship on diaries kept by three pediatric interns, two men and a woman, whose adviser he was at an unidentified hospital. They recall their transformation into experienced physicians, their initial panic, depression and doubts about the profession, their chronic exhaustion and the disruption of their personal lives. They dealt with often-fatal accidents and illness; with fetus-like premature infants and babies infected with AIDS; pregnant, disturbed, drug-addicted or VD-infected teenagers and hysterical, abusive parents; and often-hostile staff members. They criticize the internship program's applicant selection and assignment procedures and rotation system, and the long shifts which they aver adversely affect the intern's efficiency and judgment. At year's end, they mostly express relief that their internships are over.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


From Library Journal
Using the diary entries of three interns at a medical teaching facility in New York City, the author depicts the rite of passage from self-doubt, frustration, anxiety, and immaturity to personal and professional growth that occurs during the first year of post-graduate medicine. Interspersed throughout are the author's own entries, which provide background information on the interns, medical techniques and advances, hospital organization and politics, and proposed changes in medical education. The diary format effectively dramatizes the often agonizing decisions and compromises that are made in the face of sleepless nights and inexperience. This will be an important book for anyone contemplating the long, arduous task of becoming a doctor. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.
- Erna Chamberlain, SUNY at Binghamton Lib.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Ingram
From the diaries of three pediatric interns we learn of their real-life lessons in treating very sick children; confronting child abuse and the awful human impact of the AIDS epidemic; skirting the indifference of the hospital bureaucracy; overcoming their own fears, insecurities, and constant fatigue. Their stories are harrowing and often funny, their personal triumphs unforgettable. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Book Info
Discusses the status of medical training in America today and updates the reader on the lives of three young interns who first shared their stories with readers more than a decade ago. Softcover.


From the Back Cover
"Effectively dramatizes the often agonizing decisions and compromises that are made in the face of sleepless nights and inexperience... An important book."

Library Journal


"A thought-provoking study of real human beings." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


About the Author
Robert Marion, M.D., a professor of pediatrics and obstetrics and gyneclogy at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York, is the director of clinical genetics at both the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx and Blythedale Children's Hospital, Valhalla, New York. He is the author of six published books, including The Intern Blues and Learning to Play God: The Coming of Age of a Young Doctor. He lives with his family in Westchester County, New York.


Book Description
While supervising a small group of interns at a major New York medical center, Dr. Robert Marion asked three of them to keep a careful diary over the course of a year. Andy, Mark, and Amy vividly describe their real-life lessons in treating very sick children; confronting child abuse and the awful human impact of the AIDS epidemic; skirting the indifference of the hospital bureaucracy; and overcoming their own fears, insecurities, and constant fatigue. Their stories are harrowing and often funny; their personal triumph is unforgettable.

This updated edition of The Intern Blues includes a new preface from the author discussing the status of medical training in America today and a new afterword updating the reader on the lives of the three young interns who first shared their stories with readers more than a decade ago.

Robert Marion


 

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